Internet Globalization: Utilize Email for Non-English IDNs

A couple of months ago, it was announced that India-based email server software company XgenPlus rolled out an update that offers email support in various different non-ASCII (non-Latin) characters using an Internationalized Domain Name (IDN), effectively beating out Gmail, Office365, and many other prominent email hosts on this essential accomplishment in internet globalization.Over two years ago we reported a similar update from Google that offers support for Chinese characters and a variety of other languages, however XgenPlus took it up a notch by acknowledging that email support for a limited amount of IDNs was simply not enough. Demand for IDN email has grown considerably over the past couple of years, and as a response, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) hasformed a working group dedicated to bringing IDN email to prominence to serve internet-using populations who do not speak, or use, English in their daily lives in the digital world. The demand for IDN email has been partially mitigated as demonstrated by XgenPlus’s new update, and support is now available for IDNs in the following languages, with accompanying examples: Chinese Email Address: 一个@阿育王. 巴拉特 Hindi Email Address: अ@अशोका.भारत Bengali Email Address: একটি@ অশোক.ভারত Arabic Email Address: و أشوكا @ . بهارات Punjabi Email Address: ਮਨੀਸ਼ @ ਅਸ਼ੋਕ. ਭਾਰਤ ਨੂੰ Gujarati Email Address: મનીષ @ અશોક. ભારત Russian Email Address: Маниш @ Ашок. Индия Japanese Email Address: マニッシュ@アショク。インド This is huge news. Additional IDN email support means that those who speak and use the internet in one of the languages above may now set up and utilize an email in their mother tongue using a full, or partial, IDN domain...

Chinese Domaining Masterclass: An Early History of Chinese IDNs

We’re back with a new piece taken from ourChinese Domaining Masterclass! In the past, the masterclass content focused heavily on each numeric and the importance of understanding what they mean when investing in Chinese domain names. This piece is a bit different! Today, I’d like to present a brief history of Chinese IDNs. This interesting topic illustrates the  beginning of fully-Chinese scripts and how they were implemented into the DNS. This perspective will better help you understand the context behind why Chinese people want to use the internet in their own native language, and you might learn something along the way as well! With that said, let’s get started. In the Chinese internet’s early days, Chinese domains were expected The localization of the internet has always been under the spotlight for Chinese netizens and entrepreneurs, even in the earliest days of China’s internet business. The reason is obvious: that new thing called “the web” had to be accessed by URLs composed in Roman (ASCII) letters, so the learning curve was steep for a lot of Chinese people. Additionally, since Chinese companies “localized” (or cloned) almost every popular online service (Sohu and Netease cloned Yahoo, Tencent OICQ cloned ICQ), there was no reason in most Chinese minds that that URLs shouldn’t also be localized into Chinese. Along came 3721 As early as 1998, a controversial individual by the name of Zhou Hongyi had an idea for the localization of internet URLs. Here’s what Zhou’s ideas entailed: If all domain names will ultimately be resolved into IP addresses by DNS servers, a similar process could be done at a local level. By installing an ActiveX...

Get In On China’s Hot Video Trends With Fully-Chinese Domain Names

Many domain investors’ style includes keeping tabs on various trends and speculating the long-term outlook and value. If the trend seems hot today, but will likely fizzle away in the coming months, relevant domain names relating to the trend will hold little to no value at all, depending on the trend. Other topics, products, and ideas that originally start off as merely a “trend,” but look to have long-term viability, domain investors will scoop up those names faster than you can say “virtual reality.” ​Speculation and subsequent domain investment relating to various trends, based on viability of potential value increase, is a common strategy employed by domain investors, so for this next blog article I’d like to introduce a hot trend in China, and how registering relevant Chinese domain names relating to that trend is a good idea. Currently, one of the fastest growing trend in China is video. Live streaming, video sharing, short original video creation, and video apps are becoming extremely popular and growing quite rapidly among China’s massive internet population. People want to see what’s going on. Presenting products, services, educational materials, and more via visual stimulation (video, infographics, images, gifs, etc.) has long-been a popular marketing tactic to get people to notice and better pay attention to your message. I myself can admit that I tend to find visual stimulation via marketing a better way of getting me to pay attention to what’s being said, as opposed to reading text. In China, this is not only working very well, but everyday consumers are using video streaming and other methods on a daily basis, even if...

Capitalize on China’s O2O Market With a Relevant Domain Name

Trends are taking place in China on what seems like a daily basis. Innovation and creativity in technology are more often than not credited to ideas and projects nurtured in the heart of Silicon Valley in the US, however China has proven it too can pioneer advancements in technology leaving many world-renowned US technology companies in a position of trying to play catchup in order to replicate the success of many Chinese brands and businesses. Just look at WeChat. The all-encompassing mobile app has grown exponentially over the past few years, and continues to do so, bringing along an impressive arsenal of tools within the app that essentially keeps consumers on the app, for everything. WeChat has proven that what began as a groundbreaking trend can eventually evolve into a worldwide phenomenon. One trend I’d like to introduce is gaining traction in China, but isn’t too well-known in the west, or at least in the US. This trend is called Online-to-Offline commerce, or O2O. This is where goods are purchased online, and then collected in-person at an offline location. “Click-and-Collect” may be the more recognizable term for western consumers. O2O doesn’t just mean Online-to-Offline though. Switch it around and it’s still important: Offline-to-Online can be used as a marketing tool to retain customers as well, as studies show that 40% of Chinese customers prefer the in-store experience of brand interaction. Recent studies also suggest that O2O services are growing, and O2O transactions are continuing to rise as well. It’s projected that O2O transactions will grow from $335 million in 2015 to a whopping $626 million in annual sales by...

How To Spin Great Chinese IDNs, Part 2

Welcome back to the ChopChop blog for part 2 of last week’s topic: How to Spin Great Chinese IDNs. Last week, we briefly introduced you to the idea of spinning Chinese IDNs and the first steps you’d need to take to begin the process of registering valuable Chinese domains. In today’s blog, we’ll delve a little deeper into the differences and similarities of Chinese IDNs compared to English domains, and provide you with some worthwhile advice for you to consider before you continue on spinning Chinese IDNs. Without further adieu, enjoy part 2 of how to spin great Chinese IDNs! Chinese is very compact A short Chinese string can communicate a lot of meaning. Lets try to push the envelope with 8-character Chinese phrases that make good domains: 北京四中篮球校队, eight characters in total, meaning “the school basketball team of Beijing’s 4th Middle School” (or, 8 characters in Chinese vs. 48 characters in English, not including spaces or punctuation). 安徽蚌埠妇产医院, eight characters in total, meaning “the maternity hospital of Bengbu City, Anhui Province” (or, 8 characters in Chinese vs. 45 characters in English, not including spaces or punctuation). You see from these examples that portfolios of domains can be spun with readily-available input lists. Mathematically, let’s look at it this way. If a domain name must be four characters long: An English domain name could have 37 different symbols in it (the alphabet plus the dash symbol and Arabic numbers). To fill four characters, there are 37*37*37*37 = 1,874,161 different combinations. Assuming a Chinese domain name has to be based on the GB2312 character set (the smallest charset for Chinese),...

How To “Spin” Great Chinese Domain Names, Part 1

In previous blog posts, we’ve explained the many reasons why Chinese IDNs are good for brands and businesses, investors, brand protection agencies, and regular netizens, as well as the incredible opportunities they present. The reasons are sound and reliable, but we’ve yet to go over the specifics of how to “spin” great Chinese IDNs as an investor, and how to properly value them for your investment strategies. What does it mean to “spin” domain names? For those of you who may be new to domain investing, in short, spinning a domain name is the process of finding an available name based on criteria such as character length, syntax, the number of syllables, and more. So, with that said, we present our next educational resource to help you, the domain investor, spin great names and get the maximum return on your investments within the Chinese domain market. Firstly, note that certain unique qualities of the Chinese language makes the creation of investment-grade Chinese domains challenging to non-Chinese. The general principles of spinning Chinese domain names is similar to the way people been spinning English domain names. After all, they are all domain names, of the same nature (unique identification), for the same purpose (for users to locate and visit websites), and that much is universal in every country and culture. Good Chinese domain names, like English counterparts, should posses the following qualities: Be an appropriate length by Chinese standards and not be overly short simply to be short; Be easy to memorize; Be phrased to fit people’s normal speech patterns so it doesn’t sound odd, broken, or weird; Applies contemporary...